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Shotguns

Shotguns

Shotguns

SAVAGE - Up to 27% OFF

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We all know that Terminator needed no guns to be the coolest guy in the town. However, they became signature attributes of his image, together with black sunglasses and motorcycles that changed every film. Among all the guns seen in movies, shotguns are probably the iconic ones engraved into the audience's memory. Indeed, scatterguns are mesmerizing in their own way, and they look neat. The great thing about shotguns is that not only can you look at them in the movies, but you also can get one right here. We don’t recommend walking around the city and looking for Sarahs with a gun over your shoulder, but there are plenty of other things to do. 

We know what these firearms look like, but what sets them apart from other guns? Can we call a shotgun any gun that shoots? Things are a bit more complicated than that.

Shotguns are long-barreled firearms that are different from other guns in the type of projectiles they shoot. Shotguns fire straight-walled cartridges, commonly known as shells, that discharge smaller sub-projectiles after being shot. These smaller projectiles are also called shots, but shotguns can also fire a single solid projectile called a slug. Shotguns are majorly smoothbore firearms, which means their bores lack rifling of any sort, but rifled barrels are also used, primarily for shooting slug barrels.

As with every firearm, you have dozens of options to choose from. And it’s not about brands and models only, since shotguns also differ in types of actions and gauge. Many people think there is only one type, and more often than not, it’s a pump shotgun that comes to mind, but the menu is much more varied than that. We have several categories featuring shotguns with different actions, but the way a shotgun operates is not the only one of its distinctive features.

Shotgun Gauge

A gauge is a unit of measurement used to express the inner diameter of the barrel. It is measured by the weight of a solid lead sphere that fits the bore of the firearm and is expressed through the relation to one pound of lead. For example, a 16 gauge shotgun has a bore wide enough to fit a one-sixteenth pound lead ball. The smaller the number, the bigger the bore diameter. Today this type of measurement is used exclusively for shotguns. The most common varieties are 12 gauge shotguns and 20 gauge shotguns. There is one exception to the measurement rule: a .410 shotgun has the bore diameter shown in inches.

Gritr Sports has a wide scattergun collection for your consideration. Action, gauge, brand - the choice is as wide as ever. We have CZ shotguns, Savage shotguns, Mossberg shotguns, and scatterguns of other popular brands.